See You at Red Earth Herbal Gathering!

I am getting excited for the 3rd Annual Red Earth Herbal Gathering in Boulder, Colorado September 14-16! A weekend of gathering with women to honor the Earth, women, and myself is exactly what I need. I already hear the drum calling me into circle and beckoning me into the Red Tent.

The mission of Red Earth Herbal Gathering  is to be a sacred ceremonial container created by and for women to honor and activate our inherent life-nurturing power. We gather together to learn from and inspire each other through ceremony, workshops, deep healing and community building. By recognizing the beauty and power of what it is to be women doing our sacred work, our life’s calling, we step into our collective potential to support the great turning of our planet at this time. The gathering will other workshops, herb walks, kids classes, and a powerful Red Tent initiation

There are some amazing teachers and I am especially looking forward to seeing Ann Drucker speak on Maya spiritual healing plants, doing the WOMB dance with Ixeeya Lin, and practicing yoga with Rachael Caravale of Ganjasana, again this year. Since there are two nights of camping this year, we will have two nights by the fire with a song circle that is sure to bring out latent talent, laughter and tears! Oh how I can’t wait to be basking in that glow.

I will be teaching a class Sunday morning on the conscious use of essential oils entitled Rooted in Integrity: Working with Essential Oils. I will also be heading up the Wellness Area. Besides being a basic first aid station, Wellness will have some tinctures, essences, and elixirs for all to use throughout the weekend. Practitioners are welcome to offer massage, energy work, herbal consultations, or any other offering they would like to gift the other women at the gathering. I will have a couple of openings for Acutonics and Chinese tongue and pulse diagnosis and would love to talk herbs with anyone that wants to stop by!

If you haven’t registered yet, there is space for you! Join us in honoring the beauty and power of you!

With love,

JessicaBaker

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Photo credit: Red Earth Herbal Gathering Facebook page

 

Merry Meet, Merry Part, Merry Meet Again

I am completely blissed out and blessed up from the Northern California Women’s Herbal Symposium!! It’s hard to describe a place that is so sacred that I tear up every time I think about it. I first attended back in the late 90’s (’98 I believe…) and have been able to return several times over the last two decades. It is at the top of the list of things I must do as often as I can! The symposium keeps me connected, keeps me hopeful, and keeps me sane. The aura that surrounds the symposium is palpable, infused with love, wisdom, and ritual. Altars to various female deities are auspiciously and beautifully arranged and a sacred fire remains lit in the center of the  tipi circle. The magnificence of Black Oak Ranch is undeniable, but it is the magic weaved by the women that create the symposium that encompasses you. It is that feeling that keeps you coming back for more.

The symposium is so special to me that I don’t even want to talk about my experiences teaching or attending. Words can’t do justice to how beautiful the Maiden Ceremony is or how sweet the graduation for the boys that age out can be. My gratitude for the campfire songs and my river spot will have to wait until the spell of symposium has worn off and words replace revelry in my soul.

Thank you, thank you, thank you, for another opportunity to be loved, to be transformed and to be uplifted. Your presence is a gift!

I hope once day you’ll join us.

Merry Meet, Merry Part, Merry Meet Again. Until next time.

With love and gratitude,

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Jessica  

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Photo credit: NCWHS website 

Conifer Foot Bath Recipe

As I sit among the plethora of trees and other plants in the Amazon jungle I think of how grateful I am for the life I live because of them. As much as I love all trees, there is a special place in my heart for conifers like pine and redwood.

This recipe is inspired by the Tree Walk I took with Deb Soule and Kate Gilday at the International Herb Symposium and for my love of our life giving conifers. Thank you Deb and Kate for your gentle wisdom.

Take a walk through your favorite grove of conifers and breathe deeply, giving thanks for the life they have provided for millions of years. Look down and see if there are any offerings of small branches with fresh green needles on them. If so, gently pick them up and bring a small bundle back to your house. Put the branches in a large pot and cover with water. Put lid on pot and bring to a boil. Once it is boiling, turn down heat and take out one cup of tea for yourself. Cover again and simmer for 20 minutes. Take out another cup of tea for yourself.

Once the water is warm enough to use as a footbath, pour water (with or without branches) into a small tub. Soak your feet for 5-10 minutes, allowing the strength of the trees to come up through your roots, helping you stand tall and true in your convictions. Breathe and give thanks.

With love and gratitude,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

 

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Jane Bothwell

I wasn’t going to release another podcast episode until next year and then I thought you might want one to listen to on your holiday travels! In this episode I speak with my very first herb teacher, Jane Bothwell.

We discuss her annual medicinal cannabis conference and her many herbal offerings in northern California and around the globe (she is taking small groups to Hawaii and Greece in 2018). Jane’s herb school, Dandelion Herbal Center, is nestled in the redwoods in beautiful and remote Humboldt County, California. An ideal location to connect with the spirit of plants! Through her Festival of Herbs series, she invites herbalists like Rosemary Gladstar, Pam Montgomery, Christopher Hobbs and others from across the U.S. to visit and share their wisdom to the herbal community. She is a gift to us all and I am so happy to share a little of her story with you!

Enjoy this episode of The Herb Walk Podcast and Subscribe today to catch up on all of Season 1 and find out when Season 2 is released next year!

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Amanda Klenner

I learned a lot about what it takes to put on an herbal conference in this episode of The Herb Walk Podcast. I interview herbalist Amanda Klenner, owner and author of Natural Herbal Living Magazine about how her passion for herbalism began, what it was like to put on the Mountain West Herb Gathering, and much more.

Amanda Klenner is a Bio-Regional Clinical Community herbalist from Westminster, CO, where she loves to wildcraft, see clients, and teach both adults and children about the magic of herbs. She specializes in reproductive and auto-immune issues by combining customized nutrition coaching and herbal protocols, while taking lifestyle and personal energetics and goals into account. You can find her at www.naturalherballiving.com

Don’t miss an episode! Subscribe to The Herb Walk Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher today!

So much love,

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

How to Make Calendula Oil

After all that talk about how I love making herbal medicine I want to share a super easy infused oil recipe with you.

Ingredients:

250 ml Olive, Apricot kernel or Oil of choice

50-125 grams Dried Calendula flowers (100-300 grams Fresh)

Supplies:

Double Boiler

Wooden spoon

Glass Bowl

Cheesecloth

Dark, Glass Bottles

Put Calendula flowers and Apricot Kernel Oil in the Double Boiler and heat on low for 30 minutes to 2 hours.

Pour the mixture through a cheesecloth into a bowl or large mouth jar.

Press excess oil out with a wooden spoon

Pour oil into dark, glass bottles and store in a cool, dark place 

Apply oil to dry, irritated skin or add a spoonful (or two) to a warm bath for smooth, silky skin.

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Herbal Activism at the International Herb Symposium

I don’t know how I can choose what to highlight about the 13th International Herb Symposium. Between all the talented teachers that traveled from around the world to share their love of herbalism with us, the epic dance party, the $20,000 raised by the IHS for the United Plant Savers (UPS), and the chance to gather with friends I don’t see very often, this years symposium is pretty much beyond words.

Since I have to say something, I’ll start by telling you that the International Herb Symposium is a fundraiser for the nonprofit, United Plant Savers. Every two years the symposium is held to educate people about the importance of conservation when it comes to medicinal plants. The take away message from UPS this year is that the enthusiasm for herbs is outgrowing the availability of many of our plant allies. We have to start growing our own medicinal herbs and supporting local organic farmers if we want to be a part of keeping our medicine available to all. There are just not enough resources to keep up with our exponential population growth.

Many speakers, from different lineages, talked about the 6th Extinction that we are in now. It’s real folks and we have to actively be a part of the solution instead of continuing to add to the problem. Heavy news, but given with hope that we can alter the course we are on by consuming less and giving back more. I cry as I recall the words of Linda Black Elk from the Lakota tribe, about how we have profited off the medicine of the Native people of this continent, while they were denied their cultural legacies until the Religious Freedom Act of 1978. We white people have been able to practice herbalism, unobstructed and without reproach, smudging, drumming and chanting without the fear of retaliation from our government for communing with spirit and plants the way we chose to. Privilege comes in ways we aren’t even aware of. It is our responsibility to be on the front lines with Native American tribes, as they protest the innumerable pipelines and mines that infiltrate their sovereign lands. And that will ultimately affect us all. Thank you Linda Black Elk for illuminating the truth about how our freedom has come at the very high cost of yours.

I am inspired and in awe of Jacquelin (Jinpa) Guiteau, Julia Graves, and Michelle LaDue (a fellow acupuncturist!) for their mobile clinics in Haiti. They have treated over 40,000 women, men, and children with homeopathy, essential oils, herbs, and acupuncture for everything from shock to cholera. The essential oils and homeopathy are the most effective because of how many bottles they can carry, and how far the medicine goes. A single drop of essential oil in a community water barrel has stopped the spread of cholera in some areas. Every female in Haiti has some form of vaginal infection from a very young age, and a combination of a 1% dilution of tea tree and lavender is providing relief for the females they have been able to treat. Imagine the feeling of vaginal relief for the first time in your entire life. The power of plants is miraculous! Thank you thank you, Jacquelin, Julia and Michelle. Big heart hugs to you all!

The keynote speaker was Robin Wall Kimmerer, scientist, decorated professor and enrolled member of the Potawatomi Nation. She eloquently spoke of the importance of giving back to our Earth, instead of constantly taking. Robin spoke of developing a new language when speaking about our plant relations. When we refer to other forms of life as “it” then it is too easy to devalue them as we do with all of our “natural resources.” “It” doesn’t have a soul, “he” or “she” does. She suggests a new pronoun for our plants, “ki,” which comes from the ending of a Potwatomi word (I can’t find it in my notes!) and would personalize life, instead of treating “it” as if it’s life is not as important as ours. The plural would be “kin,” which is what plants are to us. They are our ancestors, our relatives, our kin.

I will share more experiences from the International Herb Symposium, since I didn’t even tell you about the ultra-talented Amikaeyla Gaston or the update on the Fire Cider Three. Those will have to come later. For now I leave you with these thoughts:

“What if you were a teacher but had no voice to speak your knowledge? What if you had no language at all and yet there was something you needed to say? Wouldn’t you dance it? Wouldn’t you act it out? Wouldn’t your every movement tell the story? In time you would be so eloquent that just to gaze upon you would reveal it all. And so it is with these silent green lives.”  – Robin Wall Kimmerer

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows 

An Herbalists Essentials for Travel

I’m getting super excited about the International Herb Symposium this weekend outside of Boston at Wheaton College. I went two years ago and had a great time learning from some of the most revered herb teachers from around the world.

One of my highlights was planting an herb garden dedicated to the grandmother of Western herbalism, Rosemary Gladstar. I look forward to seeing how the garden has grown over the last two years. I bet it will be beautiful!

As I travel this week, I am reminded at how important it is for me to stay healthy despite all the exposure from those around me. The summer epidemic season seems to have already started, as many of my friends and I had a gnarly cough and sinus congestion last week. Thankfully I am better now, but I want to make sure my immune system is strong and prepared for the adventurous week ahead.

For yesterday’s flight to Cali, I made sure to drink my daily dose of elderberry tea (which is not usually something I am taking into June- but this year I Need it!). I always have my essential oils traveling with me- planes are full of germy re-circulated air and I need my defensive team!

Here’s a list of some my essential travel oils this week:

White Sage– purifies, calms, and is able to negate the most toxic energy (be it infectious disease or that irritable passenger beside you)

Laurel– strengthens will and courage, strengthens your resolve and helps you adapt to the stresses of travel

Scots Pine– improves memory and strengthens lung qi, aids you in keeping your patience with challenges that are outside of your control.

St. John’s Wort– helps with others getting on your nerves, also great for improving qi and blood flow to the nerves after hours of sitting on planes, trains or automobiles.

As always, use common sense when using essential oils. Dilute-use sparingly-respect the earth

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

The International Herb Symposium

I’ve never wanted a May to be over as much as this one. I’m being slightly melodramatic, but next year I am spending May in California! I am getting super excited for June, and the beginning of my Summer travels.

Do you know about The International Herb Symposium June 8-12 at Wheaton College? If not, check it out!!! The IHS is The symposium to attend, as it only happens every two years and brings teachers from all over the world! I went in 2015, and knew it was one I had to attend whenever I can.

Highlights for me are seeing Rosa Tupina Yaotonalcuauhtli again. She is a Registered Nurse, Curandera, and Sacerdotista of the Sacred Moondance Ceremony. I was able to attend her classes last time, and I look forward to learning from her again.

I hope I get to take Jacquelin (Jinpa) Guiteau’s class on Healing into the Dream World, where we will learn to use plants to heal ourselves and others in dreams. Jinpa is an ordained Buddhist monk that started the Earthquake Survivor Relief Clinic in Haiti with Julia Graves.

And Rosemary Gladstar will also be there leading an herb walk. I may the most excited about this, just because Rosemary’s enthusiasm is contagious and it isn’t often that Rosemary teaches these days.

Register for the IHS!

I hope to see you there!

With love,

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Jessica

 

Inspired by Herbs: Highlights of the American Herbalist’s Guild Annual Symposium

Gathering with other herbalists and aromatherapists always fills me with such inspiration.

The presenters, as well as the participants, brought their wisdom and love for the plants, and together we created a beautiful gathering.  I would like to thank the American Herbalists Guild for their ongoing effort of inclusiveness into this organization. Their membership has grown 65 percent in the last five years, so I believe their efforts of honoring the diversity of herbal education are succeeding.

A couple of highlights of the symposium for me were hearing Phyllis Hogan describe her ethnobotanical journey with the Hopi and Navajo. She co-founded the Arizona Ethnobotanical Research Foundation, which is committed to the investigation, documentation, and preservation of the traditional plant uses in Arizona and the greater Southwest.

This symposium was the first time I’ve had the opportunity to hear David Winston speak. I really enjoyed his teaching style and use of Chinese, Cherokee and Western herbal traditions. He seems a kindred spirit and I look forward to learning more from him in the future.

I encourage all of you to attend an herbal conference! The depth of knowledge that is passed on at these events is immeasurable. I always leave with my heart and mind full!