Winter Wellness Recipe

So far I have scathed off any of the flus and viruses that are floating around the United States. On the plane from Denver to San Francisco, I was the masked person on the flight. Although I got many weird looks, I felt empowered taking my deep breaths as people coughed and sniffled around me, including the guy to my right.

In my cloth mask (thanks Willow!), I applied a diluted blend of holy basil, eucalyptus radiata, douglas fir, and pine. I also tried not to touch anything and I washed my hands religiously. That is the best I could do on a plane, but in the winter I rotate a daily preventative tea that is full of Vitamin C and antioxidants that will strengthen my immune system. This tea is not only nutritious, it’s also delicious!

Winter Wellness Tea

2 tbsp Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

2 tbsp Rose hips (Rosa centifolia

1 tbsp Citrus peel (Citrus reticulata)

1 inch piece of fresh Ginger (Zingiber offinicale)

Gently boil all ingredients in 16 ounces of water for 15 minutes in a covered pot. Strain out herbs and set aside for a second boiling. Cover and boil herbs with another 8 ounces of water for 15 minutes. Drink up to 4 cups a day as needed to prevent colds and flu. Stay well!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Finding a Good Herbalist

Yesterday I taught the Vitalist Chinese Medicine class at the Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism, as I have for the third year in a row. I just have to say how much I Love teaching about qi, the vital life force energy that encompasses all of life; transcending time and space; and taking herbs that help you propel your life forward. I mean how cool is it that I get to talk like that. And have people take me seriously! Even after I have them stick out their tongues at each other!

I love that so many people, including herbalists, are getting excited about Chinese medicine. I have heard more and more Western herbalists dappling with the concepts of Chinese medicine. And I think that’s awesome. I also find it concerning, because although there is a vague grasp of the theories, there is a deficit in understanding how to correctly diagnose the patterns that are causing the imbalances within the body. Giving or recommending an herb without the correct diagnosis can at best, kinda work, and at worst, exacerbate a condition instead of improving it.

I have clients come to me all the time telling me that they were given an herb or formula that either didn’t work or made their symptoms worse. It is usually because of two reasons:

  1. The client wasn’t compliant with the timing and doses given OR
  2. It was the wrong herb or formula based on their constitution and the root of the problem.

Chinese medicine shines in the ability to accurately diagnose patterns and get to the root of the disease. A lot Western herbal practitioners did not learn diagnostic skills, and therefore treat symptoms instead of addressing the cause of the disease. I noticed I lacked the ability to diagnose these patterns until I went to Chinese medicine school and spent years learning the nuances of the medicine.

Many Western herbal teachers are now teaching how to properly diagnose patterns that manifest in the body, but the information is slow to catch up with many herbalists. Most herbs are completely safe so not having the correct herb for someone usually does no harm. What it does do is perpetuate the thought that herbs don’t work. And we know that is not true! If you are an herbalist that works clinically, I urge you to please find a teacher that will guide you in the art and science of pattern diagnosis. If you want to find a reputable herb school or a registered herbalist to work with, check out The American Herbalists Guild directory (you’ll find me there!).  

You can also check out the first season of my podcast, The Herb Walk with Jessica Baker, where I interview some of my favorite herbalists!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Daily Nourishing Tea Recipe

I mentioned in the last blog that I had many plant allies to help me overcome my pain, fear and distraction last year. I shared my personal experiences with St. John’s Wort, Cannabis and Milky Oats. What I always find amazing is that it only takes an aroma, a touch, or a sip to feel a difference.

I’d love to share my essential nourishing morning tea recipe with you. May it nourish you as it nourishes me!

Daily Nourishing Tea

8 ounces Filtered Water

1 tsp Milky oats (Avena sativa)

1 tsp Rose petals (Rosa centafolia)

1 tsp Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

1 tsp Elderberries (Sambucus nigra)

Boil water and pour over plant material. Steep for 10-15 minutes. Strain, sip and enjoy! Drink 1-2 cups every morning as a nourishing tonic. The herbs can be steeped at least one more time.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

 

Medicine for the Soul Tea

I have shared this recipe before, but it is one of my all-time favorite teas. It is sure to nourish your body and soul, and help with any residual holy day blues you may be experiencing. Enjoy!

Medicine for the Soul 

2-3 tsp Milky Oats (Avena sativa)

2-3 tsp Hawthorn Berries (Crataegus spp.)

1-2 tsp Sage (your choice- Pineapple, White, Clary)

1/4-1/2 tsp Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)

Simmer Hawthorn berries and Cinnamon in 2-3 cups water for at least 5 minutes.  Turn heat off and steep Milky Oats for at least 5 minutes.  Add Sage the last 1-2 minutes of the steep.  Strain herbs and drink 1/2 cup of tea per serving.  Feel the herbs move through out your body and observe any sensations that may arise.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Holiday Recovery Day

I am a little tired today, hung over from rich food and a little too much chocolate. I thankfully didn’t overindulge like I have in the past (last holiday season my stomach hurt for 2 weeks straight), but I still need a little herbal help today.

It is only around 15 degrees Fahrenheit in Denver so I started it off with a creamy, steaming hot cup of Spicy Chai. The warming spices of Cinnamon, Ginger, Clove, and Fennel coupled with a frothy coconut milk did wonders for my mood this morning! To combat the lingering fatigue that can come with eating rich, fatty foods I took a dropper full of Milk Thistle tincture, along with my Medicinal Mushrooms and homemade Digestive Bitters.

Today I’ll try to take it easy on the gluten and sugar. Instead of feeling like I need to eat them all, maybe it’s time to give away the remaining holiday cookies that my husband’s mom makes for us every year. I will stay away from the last piece of cake and eat only like one piece of chocolate…

Regardless I will continue to take my Bitters and drink copious amounts of Chai.

Stay warm out there!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Citrus Cinnamon Cranberry Sauce Recipe

I, like many people, love Thanksgiving although I hate that it is through colonization and genocide of millions of people that we celebrate this day of gratitude. Those that know me may grow tired of my tirades against all so-called holidays that have been turned into excuses to do nothing more than consume.

That being said, on Thanksgiving I do love to share my favorite foods with those I love and am most grateful for! One of my favorite dishes is homemade cranberry sauce. It is super easy to make, and tastes way better than that weird gelatinous canned version I grew up with.

Citrus Cinnamon Cranberry Sauce

16 ounces cranberries

1/2 cup orange zest 

1 cinnamon stick

3/4-1 cup sugar

1/2 cup water

1/2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice

Dissolve sugar in water and orange juice. Add cranberries and stir for 10-15 minutes. Add citrus peel and cinnamon (in muslin bag) and continue to stir for another 15-20 minutes. Add more liquid if cranberries thicken too much. Turn off heat when it is to the consistency and taste you desire. Enjoy on top of a big slice of pumpkin pie!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Image credit:©Erin Clarke/Well Plated

Feels So Good Foot Bath Recipe

As the days darken and the nights grow cooler I look forward to evenings cuddled up with a book, cozy blanket and hot cup of tea. A couple of times a month I make these nights even more special with warm foot baths. I blend together my favorite flowers, hydrosols and essential oils and escape into my own aromatic oasis. Foot baths are super easy to prepare and are more rewarding than you can imagine.

Ooh, That Feels So Good Foot Bath

Bring a stockpot full of water to a boil.

Turn off heat and add a handful of your favorite fresh or dried herbs

Let herbs steep for 10-15 minutes.

Strain out enough liquid for you to enjoy a hot cup during your foot bath

Pour the rest of the tea in a plastic or resin tub large enough to place both feet

If necessary, add more warm water to cover up to your ankles.

Once the footbath is at a comfortable temperature, add 1-2 tablespoons of Diluted essential oils to the water and swirl to mix with water.

Place both feet into tub, sit back and enjoy your cup of tea.

My favorite herbs for a relaxing foot bath:

Rose petals, Lavender and Calendula flowers, and Skullcap

I like to use coconut oil as my carrier oil for essential oils in most baths because it feels so yummy and moisturizing. It’s great for rough areas like our heels so it’s perfect for foot baths.

My favorite essential oils for a relaxing foot bath:

Lavender, Vetiver, Frankincense (ethically harvested), Hemp, Ylang Ylang, Rose Geranium

Only 1-3 drops of essential oils is needed per 1 ounce of coconut oil. Remember it takes a lot of plant material to make a small amount of essential oil. Use sparingly and respectfully.

This is a super simple recipe, yet relaxing to mind, body, and spirit. Take the time for yourself tonight. You deserve it.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

 

Find (& Spread) Peace and Harmony

I just spent five days at the Pacific Symposium at the Catamaran Resort in San Diego. The Pacific Symposium brings Chinese medicine scholars from all over the world together to share their love of this ancient medicine.

As always, I come back full of enthusiasm and reverence for this life I have chosen. I am reminded that we are dynamic energetic beings that are deeply connected to all life in the universe. We are of one source of energy or qi, navigating time, space, and matter as best we can.

We are also broken people. On a constant quest for self, we have forgotten our innate connection to everything else. Chinese medicine reminds me that we are wood, earth, fire, water, and metal. We cycle with the planets, moon, and tide. We cycle together, in rhythm and harmony.

It is evident that we are out of rhythm, out of sync with this universal energy. We all feel it and it is manifesting in the extreme violence, fear, and sadness that is pervading our society. It is overwhelming. Thankfully we have a multitude of tools to help bring us back into balance.

Breathe– the most obvious and for me sometimes the hardest

I hold my breath all the time. Throughout the day when I begin to feel tired, anxious or fearful I notice I am holding my breath. Check in with yourself and see if you too are holding your breath.

Practice Gratitude– not for what you have, but for what nature provides

I find that when I have gratitude for air for breath, trees and plants for food, medicine, shelter, and clothing, and water for all of life, it brings me a sense of peaceful wholeness. Breathe and notice what you are grateful for.

Take your Herbs– food is medicine

I have had subtle and profound changes in my life from taking herbs. I sip a cup of warm chamomile tea after dinner and I begin to relax. I add a pinch of cinnamon and ginger to my morning oatmeal and I am warmed by their presence. From basil in our pesto to pepper on our eggs, herbs have been an integral part of our daily lives.

Keep it Simple– life is easier than we make it

Breathe, say thanks, and remember our plant medicine. If you practice these three things I promise life will be a little easier. I’m not saying it is going to solve all the world’s problems, but it will make your day a little better. Remember when we are more balanced, we will be less aggressive, afraid, or apathetic. Sometimes that is all we can do for the world.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends

Somehow all the craziness of the last few weeks has finally left my body and I am starting to feel “normal” again. Right now, “normal” means I have hours where I don’t feel panicked or despair. I am sleeping pretty well again and I don’t believe we are all going to hell in a hand basket. At least not today.

When my anxiety rises I’ve noticed all of my self-care techniques and advice to my clients go out the window. It’s like I don’t know what herbs and oils I need to be in balance. I am great at doing this for others, but not always for myself. I finally got enough distance from it to remember what I need to do.

  1. Breathe! It sounds obvious but it’s not. I have finally been taking deep breaths and it feels great! 
  2. Drink herbal tea! Again, sounds easy enough but when I’m stressed I go for black tea instead of nourishing nervines. My favorite this week (and every week)- skullcap and oat straw.
  3. Sniff essential oils! Not straight out of the bottle necessarily, but I’ve been using my diluted roll-ons. This week my go-to’s have been St. John’s Wort, Hemp, and Frankincense. My mood has improved and I have a much brighter outlook on life. 
  4. Walk in the woods. Or sit on the beach. Or go into nature and just be. You will feel wonderful. And you’ll breathe better!

For the love of plants,

Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Lisa Ganora

This week’s interview on The Herb Walk Podcast is with Lisa Ganora!

Lisa began studying herbs in the Wise Woman Tradition back in 1986 and fell profoundly in love with medicinal plants and natural healing. While studying wildcrafting and medicine-making with traditional herbalists from New England to the Appalachian Mountains for ten years, she began creating herbal products and traveled the festival circuit with an herb booth and as a workshop presenter.

In 1997 Lisa decided to study botany, chemistry, and health sciences at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, and graduated with highest honors and several awards. Lisa combines a deep understanding of traditional, Vitalist herbalism with a scientifically-integrated and holistic approach to natural health.

In addition to directing CSCH, Lisa is also an Adjunct Professor of Pharmacognosy at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine in Tempe, Arizona, and has lectured and taught classes at numerous schools and conferences around the U.S. She is the author of Herbal Constituents, the standard textbook of phytochemistry for herbalists.

I hope you enjoy this episode of The Herb Walk Podcast. Download on iTunes and Stitcher today!

Simple & Nourishing Tisane

I’m paying homage to my first herb teacher, Jane Bothwell, with my recipe post today.

This was probably one of the first herbal blends I ever made, and definitely the first I drank that wasn’t Celestial Seasonings Chamomile, Peppermint, or Sleepy Time.

I remember Jane speaking of each plant with love and reverence. Although I hadn’t really been exposed to herbalism, everything she said made sense. The way she spoke about herbs resonated deep within me and I knew at that very first class that herbalism would be a part of my life.

Thank you Jane for sparking my passion for herbal medicine!

Simple & Nourishing Herbal Tisane

1 handful of Nettles

1 handful of Milky Oats or Oatstraw

1 handful of Spearmint

1 handful of Red Raspberry leaves

If you have access to these herbs fresh- perfect! If not, dried is wonderful too!

Steep herbs in 1 quart of boiled water and steep for 15-20 minutes (or sit for a couple of hours in the sun)

Strain herbs (or not- herbalists like to strain through their teeth, lol!)

Sip and be nourished.

 

With love,

 

Jessica

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Monticue Connally

He sings, he raps, he’s also a medicine man. This week’s interview on The Herb Walk Podcast is with Denver musician and herbalist, Monticue Connally. Listen as Monticue sings, raps, and discusses his intimate relationship with spirits and plant medicine. Don’t miss an episode…Download The Herb Walk Podcast on iTunes and Stitcher!

Strong Woman Tea

In preparation for my class at this year’s Red Earth Herbal Gathering (August 19-20 in Longmont, Colorado- tickets still available!) I want to share this nourishing and delicious sun tea to support women’s health and wellbeing. This is one of my go-to teas when I feel fatigued, overwhelmed, or out of balance. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Strong Woman Tea

2 tbsp Red Raspberry leaf

1 tbsp Milky Oat tops

1 tbsp Marshmallow root

1 tsp Vitex seeds

1 tsp Nettle leaf

Place all herbs into a glass quart jar and cover with filtered tap water or spring water. Set in the sun for 4 hours or so. Strain out herbs and drink the tea over the next couple of days. You will feel great!

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

How to Make Calendula Salve

Last week I shared a recipe on how to make a calendula infused oil. If you’re ready, we can take this oil and make it into a salve. It’s super easy and fun!

Ingredients:

250 ml Calendula or other Herbal Oil

6-8 ounces beeswax

10 drops Essential oil of choice (optional)

Supplies:

Double Boiler

Wooden spoon

Dark, Glass Jars

Essential Oils

Heat oil and beeswax in a Double Boiler on low heat until beeswax is completely melted.

Test the firmness by placing a tablespoon of mixture in the freezer for 1-2 minutes. For a softer salve, add more oil. For a harder salve, add more beeswax.

Remove salve mixture from heat and add 10 drops essential oil. Stir with wooden spoon.

Immediately pour into dark, glass jars. Put on lids after salve has cooled.

Used on dry, irritated skin, bug bites, or scrapes.

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

How to Make Calendula Oil

After all that talk about how I love making herbal medicine I want to share a super easy infused oil recipe with you.

Ingredients:

250 ml Olive, Apricot kernel or Oil of choice

50-125 grams Dried Calendula flowers (100-300 grams Fresh)

Supplies:

Double Boiler

Wooden spoon

Glass Bowl

Cheesecloth

Dark, Glass Bottles

Put Calendula flowers and Apricot Kernel Oil in the Double Boiler and heat on low for 30 minutes to 2 hours.

Pour the mixture through a cheesecloth into a bowl or large mouth jar.

Press excess oil out with a wooden spoon

Pour oil into dark, glass bottles and store in a cool, dark place 

Apply oil to dry, irritated skin or add a spoonful (or two) to a warm bath for smooth, silky skin.

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

My Love of Herbal Medicine Making

I love it when my clients say that they make their own medicine or grown their own herbs. I firmly believe that our strongest medicines are the ones we make ourselves. Don’t get me wrong. Part of my business relies on sales of formulas I make and sell, but I am almost giddy when I her that a client wants to make her own tea, tincture, or salve.

I know the strongest medicine is what you make yourself. It’s also not something everyone can or wants to do. It gives me great joy to formulate for people, infuse my magic and love into their blends, and then give them with confidence that the herbs are going to have a profound impact on their lives.

Working with plants has completely changed my life. I am so grateful for their teachings, for their wisdom, for the life they provide us all. I am honored to be a voice for the medicinal herbs, for the wildflowers, and for the trees. There are many online herb schools to choose from. I encourage you to deepen your connection with plants; your life will be forever enriched.

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Take Time Out For Beauty

Growing up in the south, I am used to hot summer days. What is new to me is the dryness that accompanies the heat in Colorado. In some ways it makes the heat more bearable and you sweat less, but it is not the appropriate climate for my constitution. Since I have moved to Colorado my skin is dry and reactive in a way I have never experienced. Splotchy red in some places, pimples in another, and underlying it all, the feeling that no matter how much serum or moisturizer I apply my skin doesn’t look or feel hydrated.

Thankfully one of my besties Diane Avitable, has created a botanical Restore & Repair Processed with VSCO with f2 presetFacial Oil through her company, Take Time Out for Beauty. Not only does it smell delicious, with her combination of jasmine and rose, but also for the first time in a year, I wake up with my skin hydrated and glowing! I love it!

I know her facia oil works so well because Diane makes a rich base of botanical oils, the only way your skin can be truly nourished and healed. Restore & Repair is lightweight, bio available, and easily absorbed by the skin. Her facial oil is designed to repair the protective barrier layer of the skin. It calms and soothes irritation, balances natural oil production, nourishes and restores from the inside out! To make it even more amazing, Repair & Restore fights free radical damage, countering the signs of aging, illuminating and enhancing your skins natural glow.

Check out Take Time Out for Beauty and all Diane has to offer! I personally love her Instagram account, follow her today!

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

How to Sustainably Harvest Herbs

Everywhere I’ve traveled our wild herbs s are going off! One of my favorite things to do is to go wildcrafting my own medicine. With popularity of herbs on the rise I have had to curb my natural instinct to harvest medicine because now I don’t know how many others are also going to pick from that spot.

It’s funny how things change. When I first started taking herbal classes in the late 1990’s emphasis was put on wildcrafting and harvesting your own herbs. I was even taught that wild plants had the strongest medicine. Now with all the over harvesting of many of our herbs (ginseng only being one of them), herb teachers talk more about organically growing your own herbs or buying from small organic herb farmers.

We should be growing our own herbs (and food), but I am a little saddened by not having the freedom to harvest in the wild as I once did. For the future of our herbal allies, this is what we must do.

If you still want to harvest a little, here are general guidelines:

Always ask the plant permission first- and then Listen to the answer.

If permission is given, take less than 1% of what is growing.

For herbs where once we used mostly the root, try the leaves and stems too. Instead of killing the plant, you may just find some potent medicine in arial parts of the plant.

Always give a prayer, gift or blessing to the plant for the medicine they provide.

Please do your part to keep herbalism alive and viable for future generations.

With love,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows

Lemon Balm Lemonade Recipe

July is hot here in Denver and there’s nothing like a refreshing glass of iced cold lemonade. I know, I know. As an acupuncturist I shouldn’t encourage drinking iced beverages, but I am making an exception for this cooling and medicinal lemonade!

Lemon Balm Lemonade (aka: Melissa’s Lemonade)

Handful of fresh lemon balm

6 lemons

1/2 cup honey (more if desired)

1 cup boiling water

3 cups spring water

Ice

Scrub lemons, peel the rind thinly avoiding the white; set aside.

Place the lemon rind, lemon balm leaves and the honey into a small heat-proof pitcher.  Pour the boiling water into the pitcher and stir well, crushing the lemon balm leaves to release their flavor.  Let steep 15 minutes.

Cut lemons in half and squeeze out the juice.  Strain juice into pitcher, add a few fresh sprigs of lemon balm, then add the cooled, strained syrup.  Top with water and ice. Take a long drink and enjoy!

With love,

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Jessica

 

when energy flows, wellness grows

Herbal Activism at the International Herb Symposium

I don’t know how I can choose what to highlight about the 13th International Herb Symposium. Between all the talented teachers that traveled from around the world to share their love of herbalism with us, the epic dance party, the $20,000 raised by the IHS for the United Plant Savers (UPS), and the chance to gather with friends I don’t see very often, this years symposium is pretty much beyond words.

Since I have to say something, I’ll start by telling you that the International Herb Symposium is a fundraiser for the nonprofit, United Plant Savers. Every two years the symposium is held to educate people about the importance of conservation when it comes to medicinal plants. The take away message from UPS this year is that the enthusiasm for herbs is outgrowing the availability of many of our plant allies. We have to start growing our own medicinal herbs and supporting local organic farmers if we want to be a part of keeping our medicine available to all. There are just not enough resources to keep up with our exponential population growth.

Many speakers, from different lineages, talked about the 6th Extinction that we are in now. It’s real folks and we have to actively be a part of the solution instead of continuing to add to the problem. Heavy news, but given with hope that we can alter the course we are on by consuming less and giving back more. I cry as I recall the words of Linda Black Elk from the Lakota tribe, about how we have profited off the medicine of the Native people of this continent, while they were denied their cultural legacies until the Religious Freedom Act of 1978. We white people have been able to practice herbalism, unobstructed and without reproach, smudging, drumming and chanting without the fear of retaliation from our government for communing with spirit and plants the way we chose to. Privilege comes in ways we aren’t even aware of. It is our responsibility to be on the front lines with Native American tribes, as they protest the innumerable pipelines and mines that infiltrate their sovereign lands. And that will ultimately affect us all. Thank you Linda Black Elk for illuminating the truth about how our freedom has come at the very high cost of yours.

I am inspired and in awe of Jacquelin (Jinpa) Guiteau, Julia Graves, and Michelle LaDue (a fellow acupuncturist!) for their mobile clinics in Haiti. They have treated over 40,000 women, men, and children with homeopathy, essential oils, herbs, and acupuncture for everything from shock to cholera. The essential oils and homeopathy are the most effective because of how many bottles they can carry, and how far the medicine goes. A single drop of essential oil in a community water barrel has stopped the spread of cholera in some areas. Every female in Haiti has some form of vaginal infection from a very young age, and a combination of a 1% dilution of tea tree and lavender is providing relief for the females they have been able to treat. Imagine the feeling of vaginal relief for the first time in your entire life. The power of plants is miraculous! Thank you thank you, Jacquelin, Julia and Michelle. Big heart hugs to you all!

The keynote speaker was Robin Wall Kimmerer, scientist, decorated professor and enrolled member of the Potawatomi Nation. She eloquently spoke of the importance of giving back to our Earth, instead of constantly taking. Robin spoke of developing a new language when speaking about our plant relations. When we refer to other forms of life as “it” then it is too easy to devalue them as we do with all of our “natural resources.” “It” doesn’t have a soul, “he” or “she” does. She suggests a new pronoun for our plants, “ki,” which comes from the ending of a Potwatomi word (I can’t find it in my notes!) and would personalize life, instead of treating “it” as if it’s life is not as important as ours. The plural would be “kin,” which is what plants are to us. They are our ancestors, our relatives, our kin.

I will share more experiences from the International Herb Symposium, since I didn’t even tell you about the ultra-talented Amikaeyla Gaston or the update on the Fire Cider Three. Those will have to come later. For now I leave you with these thoughts:

“What if you were a teacher but had no voice to speak your knowledge? What if you had no language at all and yet there was something you needed to say? Wouldn’t you dance it? Wouldn’t you act it out? Wouldn’t your every movement tell the story? In time you would be so eloquent that just to gaze upon you would reveal it all. And so it is with these silent green lives.”  – Robin Wall Kimmerer

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows