The Return of Autumn

I’m back after a long summer hiatus! I didn’t expect it to be so long, but it has seriously felt like summer until just a couple of days ago. Oklahoma summers are no joke! After months of extreme heat and high winds, the mornings and evenings are now cool and our long work days in the garden are winding down. I just froze the last of the okra harvest (no-not mine, but some gems from a sweet old man I met at his Davenport roadside stand).

We have begun the harvest of our Legal cannabis garden. I’ve been growing medical cannabis for two decades and I am as excited today as when I first began. Most of the outdoor plants have been trimmed and are ready to be sold at our dispensary, Bakers Medical. The hoop houses are still a few weeks from being ready. I suspect they will turn out even better than the outdoor plants. I am ecstatic about our first harvest season here in Oklahoma!

Our dispensary should be open anytime now. Just waiting on a couple more inspections and we should be good to go. I will breathe a deep sigh of relief once we Finally up and running! Once we’re open- send your Oklahoma City friends (with a medical card) to Bakers Medical!

So now you know what I’ve been busy doing all summer. Trying to run multiple cannabis businesses, while continuing to teach, write and relax by our ponds. New episodes of The Herb Walk Podcast are in the works and will be released in the coming weeks. Stay tuned for interviews and musings on herbalism, Chinese medicine, and cannabis.

For those that want to hear an interview with me on MindBody Radio, tune in live Tuesday October 15th at 4:15 CDT!

To learn more about Autumn (and the Metal Element) according to Chinese medicine, check out my Metal Element episode of The Herb Walk with Jessica Baker.

Much love,

The Return of Autumn

Jessica

The Herb Walk Podcast: Nettle Episode

I don’t talk about my book, Plant Songs: Reflections on Herbal Medicine very often. To be honest, I’m still kinda shy about it. Besides information on my favorite herbs, I also share some personal stories of my life. Which is really hard for me!

In this episode of The Herb Walk with Jessica Baker, I read from my Nettle chapter. Nettle is the ultimate “Pay Attention” plant. If you don’t, Nettle will remind you every time! I recall my memories of hiking in the Annapurna Mountain Range in Nepal and getting the message of Nettle very clear that if I should pay attention. I’m glad I did!

Only one more podcast episode left until I break for summer. Just as a teaser- it’s all about Tobacco….

With love,

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Stephanie Boucher of Cannabotanicals

This is the last in a series of interviewing women in the cannabis space. Today’s Herb Walk Podcast episode is with Stephanie Boucher, of Cannabotanicals.

Stephanie created Cannabotanicals to bring cannabis back into the modern herbal apothecary, keep it in the hands of the people, and utilize it as the powerful transformational tool that it is. We had a great conversation about how she got interested in herbalism and then inadvertently cannabis. This is an episode not to be missed!

Listen, subscribe and please leave a review so others can find The Herb Walk Podcast!

With love,

Jessica

The Herb Walk Podcast: Hawthorn Episode

Tomorrow many of us celebrate Thanksgiving so I thought I’d share the next episode of The Herb Walk Podcast for you to listen to while you’re traveling to see loved ones.

I’m keeping this one short and sweet, a little teaser from the Hawthorn chapter of my book, Plant Songs: Reflections on Herbal Medicine

Remember to Subscribe, so you don’t miss an episode! I also just uploaded an episode of The Real Dirt with Chip Baker, where I’m asked about the truth behind the misconceptions of Cannabis sativa and indica.  Next week’s blog I’ll share my thoughts on MJBizCon and a post I wrote for The Real Dirt blog going into more depth about the origins of Cannabis. I think you may be surprised!

With love,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Elder Rose Immuni-Tea Recipe

Brrrrrrr…a cold, wet storm has been hovering over Colorado for the last few days. The leaves have turned, and I see the squirrels scurry around preparing for the coming Winter, I have been wearing my scarf and gloves, but for the first time since I moved to Denver, I am not lamenting the coming cold.

I am excited to make more oatmeal congees, where I will add butter and honey, cinnamon, ginger, jujube dates, and citrus peel. I look forward to big pots of beans and stewed roots. I will have early nights of reading by dimmed lights, with a warm cup of herbal tea by my side. Just writing about it makes me want to cuddle up with a good book.

I’ve been drinking a really delicious tea lately and it is perfect for not only warming heart and soul on cold nights, it is also full of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins, which have shown to fight infections and reduce effects of colds and flu. I drink a couple of cups each morning, but you can have up to a quart a day if you so desire.

Elder Rose Immuni-Tea

2 ounces dried Elderberries (Sambucus nigra)

2 ounces dried Citrus peel (Citrus reticulata) organic or unsprayed; I use mandarin or tangerine peels

1/2 ounce dried Red Rose petals (Rosa centifola) organic or unsprayed

1/2 ounce dried Milky Oats (Avena sativa)

1/4 ounce dried Nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) 

Mix all ingredients together and store in a glass jar in a cool, dark location. Use 2-3 tbsp of herbs per 2 cups of tea. Boil water and pour hot water over herbs for 10-20 minutes, cover with lid. Strain herbs and set aside to use one more time (if steeped for less than 20 minutes). Add honey if desired. Sip and feel the herbs nourish and strengthen your body, mind, and spirit.

To find out more about making infusion, watch my Youtube video How To Make An Herbal Infusion, subscribe to my Youtube channel and watch videos on Chinese medicine, Western herbalism, Aromatherapy and more!

With love,

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Jessica Baker, LAc, RH (AHG)

when energy flows, wellness grows

Lovin’ It All Up Sun Tea Recipe

Lovin’ It All Up Sun Tea

1-3 tablespoon of the following fresh herbs:

Stinging Nettle, Dandelion, Plantain, Lemon Balm, Wild Violet flowers, and/or your favorite herbal allies 

Lightly garble all herbs together and put in your favorite clear glass jar (and a teaspoon of honey if you want to).  Pour cool spring water over the herbs and sit jar in the sun for as long as you desire. Strain off herbs and give back to the earth with thanks for her nourishment. Drink tea with gratitude for your life and for everyone else’s too.

With love and gratitude for all of life,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows

Photo credit: Me

Cannabis Chai Recipe

To get us all ready for the big cannabis celebration tomorrow (420) I thought I’d share one of the recipes from my book, Plant Songs.

I hope you enjoy this chai as much as I do. Not only is it delicious, you’ll feel pretty good too!

Cannabis Chai

–       3 grams dried cannabis flowers

–       1 tablespoon Assam or Darjeeling

–       1 crushed cardamom pod

–       1 inch piece of fresh ginger root

–       1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds

–       1/4 teaspoon dried orange peel

–        1 teaspoon cinnamon powder

Simmer 4 ounces water, 4 ounces of milk (the fattier the better—whole milk or coconut milk), and all ingredients together for 20 minutes. Strain out cannabis and other ingredients and set aside. Drink 2-4 ounces of the tea as needed to promote appetite, reduce nausea or as a gentle relaxer. 

To enjoy this recipe and others, order Plant Songs today!

With love and gratitude,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Realities of Cannabis Legalization in California

Emotions are high as cannabis legalization comes to fruition in California. There is eagerness as the green rush (or weed greed, as I call it) brings professionals into a market where there was once only “criminals” or outlaws. The pink shirts can’t wait to make money off the backs of those once vilified and imprisoned for fighting for the decriminalization of cannabis. I openly hope that the pink shirts like John Boehner don’t thrive, as some of these hypocrites were the loudest to criticize cannabis users.

There is fear from those that have made their livelihood off of the private cannabis market and aren’t sure how they fit into the new legal industry. Those that have been able to conduct business unregulated and untaxed are now in the most over-regulated and over-taxed industries in the state. In the Emerald Triangle (Humboldt, Trinity and Mendocino counties) where cannabis cultivation has been what keeps the local economy afloat, I have heard many growers say they are priced out because local agencies require absurd regulations that have never been applied to any other industry.

There is also excitement as anyone 21 and over can legally purchase cannabis at retail stores across the state (or will soon once local jurisdictions get it together to grant permits). I will admit that I am stoked that I can walk into a store and buy a sack of weed and a bar of ganja chocolate. It will be even better when the taxes on cannabis are not so high.

As those that participate in the new public cannabis market, we have to work hard to make sure that everyone that is still incarcerated for cannabis related “crimes” are set free. I don’t think it’s too much to ask that with some of the tax money from cannabis, that we pay reparations for those whose lives were ruined when they were busted for cultivating or dealing weed. In this new world of cannabis freedom, we have to remember that it is not equal opportunity for all as we like to believe.

With love and gratitude,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Energetics of Dandelion

Spring has arrived in Denver with sunshine, wind, and even a little rain. I am in no denial that we can have more snowstorms, but I am excited to see all the new growth popping up everywhere.

The dandelions are back! The bright yellow flowers are reaching for the sun, while that taproot is digging deep into the earth, defying those grubby hands that want to pull it out. I haven’t seen any bees yet, but I’m sure they’re waking from their slumber and will be buzzing around soon. They love dandelion like herbalists do.

Instead of thinking of dandelion as a noxious weed, think of it as one of the first foods that spring has to offer. The umbrella of yellow a reflection of the long, warm days ahead.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Western Energetics:

leaf, flower- bitter, salty, cool

root- bitter, cool

 Chinese Energetics:

entire plant- bitter, sweet, cold

Therapeutic Actions:

Clears heat and toxicity from the blood

Reduces nodules and sores

Promotes urination

Reduces congestion of bile

Promotes lactation

Vitamins:

A, C, E, K, B1, B2, B6

Minerals:

Calcium, Magnesium, Folate, Iron, Potassium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Copper

Fiber:

Contains inulin, a prebiotic fiber that enhances the production of healthy gut bacteria

 Dandelion greens and flowers are a delicious addition to your salads, soups, and steamed veggies. May you see dandelion in a more appreciative light!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

 

Time Keeps on Ticking…

The 1st of March! What?! Yep, time is cruising by and spring will be here before you know it. It’s a little overwhelming as I plan my year and already seem like my free time is fleeting! When I feel the apprehension rise, I remember to breathe and stay present in the moment. I refuse to fall into the trap of ‘there’s not enough time’ when in reality time is relevant, and when I slow down in my thoughts and actions, I don’t feel the rush of time passing.

Along with my Milky Oats (Avena sativa) and Nettle (Urtica dioica) tea, I have been wearing my aromatic blends that include essential oils of Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanoides) and Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) which both relax the nervous system and Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Pine (Pinus sylvestris), that helps deepen the breath and strengthen your resilience to change. My plant allies are crucial to navigate life in this fast-paced world! I think you will find them helpful for you as well.

I urge you to find what plants call to you. To deepen your connection to nature, find a class or conference near you. Herb Rally is a great resource that lists hundreds of classes across the U.S. Check them out and start your journey with plants!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Morning Cup of Tea

It hardly seems like winter this week in Northern California. Instead of our steady fog and rain, we have had sunshine and temperatures in the mid 60’s. No complaints here as I soak up as much sun as I can!

It is getting brighter in the mornings and the days are gradually increasing, making the warmer days of spring more of a reality. I am still taking my daily tonics as people are still getting sick around me and I do my best to avoid going down like that. Especially since I leave for a yoga retreat in Tulum in 10 days!

I have been loving the Tulsi Rose tea from Humboldt Herbals. I worked at Humboldt Herbals many moons ago when they first opened in Old Town Eureka 20 years ago! Time flies, and us with it! Check out all the herbs, teas, essential oils, skin care, and other goodies they have to offer. You can also hear my interview with the proprietress of Humboldt Herbals, Julie Caldwell.

The combination of Rose Petals, Tulsi Bail, Red Raspberry leaf, and Green Cardamom is mildly spicy and so delicious. Sometimes I add a pinch of  Elderberry and Star Anise to keep my immune system even stronger. Either with little honey or unsweetened, this blend keeps me healthy and happy.

May you also enjoy a nourishing cup of herbal tea today!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Photo credit: Shutterstock

Winter Musings (in a Redwood forest)

I have been in heaven the last few days. The medicine of fog and rain, mixed with a little sunshine and rainbows has been just what I needed. Although the grey dreary days of North Coast winters can contribute to seasonal depression, it is a great reprieve from the dry, cold winds of Colorado. My spirit needs moisture!

The weather is maritime and mild and many of favorite plants are thriving and saying hello, so I have been enjoying the walks around our land. We are only about a mile from the Pacific ocean and as I wander through the redwoods, I can hear the waves crashing while I harvest self-heal, yarrow, violet, and plantain leaves for my tea. The ocean being the Water element incarnate, I am even more nourished by this winter ritual.

Nature heals. If you aren’t sure about that, go take a walk among trees, sit at the edge of a lake or river, or gaze at the mountains in the distance. Take three deep breaths and notice how you feel. Are you more relaxed, content, or at peace? If not, take a few more deep breaths and reflect on what you are grateful for. Give thanks for every breath you are blessed to take.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

 

Winter Wellness Recipe

So far I have scathed off any of the flus and viruses that are floating around the United States. On the plane from Denver to San Francisco, I was the masked person on the flight. Although I got many weird looks, I felt empowered taking my deep breaths as people coughed and sniffled around me, including the guy to my right.

In my cloth mask (thanks Willow!), I applied a diluted blend of holy basil, eucalyptus radiata, douglas fir, and pine. I also tried not to touch anything and I washed my hands religiously. That is the best I could do on a plane, but in the winter I rotate a daily preventative tea that is full of Vitamin C and antioxidants that will strengthen my immune system. This tea is not only nutritious, it’s also delicious!

Winter Wellness Tea

2 tbsp Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

2 tbsp Rose hips (Rosa centifolia

1 tbsp Citrus peel (Citrus reticulata)

1 inch piece of fresh Ginger (Zingiber offinicale)

Gently boil all ingredients in 16 ounces of water for 15 minutes in a covered pot. Strain out herbs and set aside for a second boiling. Cover and boil herbs with another 8 ounces of water for 15 minutes. Drink up to 4 cups a day as needed to prevent colds and flu. Stay well!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Live & Love Spritzer

I’m feeling a little bluesy today because of the news of three strong women passing in just a couple of days. The one that hit the hardest was the death of one of my best friend’s mom. I am extremely sad and still a little in shock. I am once again reminded of how precious life is and how important it is to live every day to the fullest.

Today’s recipe is for her. She was a feisty, strong woman with a love that knew no boundaries. Babs, I send this aromatic offering to you. May your journey into the unknown be filled with love, peace, and light. Big hugs to you on the other side from your J Jesser!

Live & Love Spritzer

3 drops Mount Shasta Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) essential oil

3 drops Rose (Rosa centifolia) essential oil

1 drop Angelica (Angelica archangelica) essential oil

Add all essential oils to a 1 ounce glass spray bottle and add spring water to fill. Shake well. Spritz yourself as needed to remind yourself how loved and supported you are. Give thanks to your angels and guides for guiding you on your path. Be grateful that you are alive!

Much love,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Finding a Good Herbalist

Yesterday I taught the Vitalist Chinese Medicine class at the Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism, as I have for the third year in a row. I just have to say how much I Love teaching about qi, the vital life force energy that encompasses all of life; transcending time and space; and taking herbs that help you propel your life forward. I mean how cool is it that I get to talk like that. And have people take me seriously! Even after I have them stick out their tongues at each other!

I love that so many people, including herbalists, are getting excited about Chinese medicine. I have heard more and more Western herbalists dappling with the concepts of Chinese medicine. And I think that’s awesome. I also find it concerning, because although there is a vague grasp of the theories, there is a deficit in understanding how to correctly diagnose the patterns that are causing the imbalances within the body. Giving or recommending an herb without the correct diagnosis can at best, kinda work, and at worst, exacerbate a condition instead of improving it.

I have clients come to me all the time telling me that they were given an herb or formula that either didn’t work or made their symptoms worse. It is usually because of two reasons:

  1. The client wasn’t compliant with the timing and doses given OR
  2. It was the wrong herb or formula based on their constitution and the root of the problem.

Chinese medicine shines in the ability to accurately diagnose patterns and get to the root of the disease. A lot Western herbal practitioners did not learn diagnostic skills, and therefore treat symptoms instead of addressing the cause of the disease. I noticed I lacked the ability to diagnose these patterns until I went to Chinese medicine school and spent years learning the nuances of the medicine.

Many Western herbal teachers are now teaching how to properly diagnose patterns that manifest in the body, but the information is slow to catch up with many herbalists. Most herbs are completely safe so not having the correct herb for someone usually does no harm. What it does do is perpetuate the thought that herbs don’t work. And we know that is not true! If you are an herbalist that works clinically, I urge you to please find a teacher that will guide you in the art and science of pattern diagnosis. If you want to find a reputable herb school or a registered herbalist to work with, check out The American Herbalists Guild directory (you’ll find me there!).  

You can also check out the first season of my podcast, The Herb Walk with Jessica Baker, where I interview some of my favorite herbalists!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica 

when energy flows, wellness grows 

Medicine for the Soul Tea

I have shared this recipe before, but it is one of my all-time favorite teas. It is sure to nourish your body and soul, and help with any residual holy day blues you may be experiencing. Enjoy!

Medicine for the Soul 

2-3 tsp Milky Oats (Avena sativa)

2-3 tsp Hawthorn Berries (Crataegus spp.)

1-2 tsp Sage (your choice- Pineapple, White, Clary)

1/4-1/2 tsp Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)

Simmer Hawthorn berries and Cinnamon in 2-3 cups water for at least 5 minutes.  Turn heat off and steep Milky Oats for at least 5 minutes.  Add Sage the last 1-2 minutes of the steep.  Strain herbs and drink 1/2 cup of tea per serving.  Feel the herbs move through out your body and observe any sensations that may arise.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Bitter Herbs to the Rescue

Feeling a bit better today now that I’ve had a couple of days away from holiday treats. I haven’t felt the bloating and indigestion that can accompany eating gluten, dairy, sugar and other irritants. I credit my healthy digestion to Digestive Bitters. I’ve been taking Bitters for almost fifteen years, and now they are all the rage (with good reason!) Many of our digestive issues could benefit from taking Bitters before meals as a way to stimulate digestion, transform nutrients, and maintain the integrity of cellular membranes.

Digestive Bitters

1 gram organic dried Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) root

1 gram organic dried Gentian (Gentiiana lute)a root

1 gram organic dried Tangerine (Citrus reticulata) peel

1 gram organic dried Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) seeds

1 inch slice of organic fresh Ginger (Zingiber officinale) root

Add all ingredients to 8 ounces of Organic Vodka. Cover with lid and store in dark, cool location. Shake daily for 2-4 weeks. Strain out herbs and store liquid in dark colored, glass container. Take 8-10 drops of tincture before each meal to prevent indigestion or after meals to reduce gas and bloating.

I’d love to hear how this recipe worked for you!

For the love of plants,

 

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Holiday Recovery Day

I am a little tired today, hung over from rich food and a little too much chocolate. I thankfully didn’t overindulge like I have in the past (last holiday season my stomach hurt for 2 weeks straight), but I still need a little herbal help today.

It is only around 15 degrees Fahrenheit in Denver so I started it off with a creamy, steaming hot cup of Spicy Chai. The warming spices of Cinnamon, Ginger, Clove, and Fennel coupled with a frothy coconut milk did wonders for my mood this morning! To combat the lingering fatigue that can come with eating rich, fatty foods I took a dropper full of Milk Thistle tincture, along with my Medicinal Mushrooms and homemade Digestive Bitters.

Today I’ll try to take it easy on the gluten and sugar. Instead of feeling like I need to eat them all, maybe it’s time to give away the remaining holiday cookies that my husband’s mom makes for us every year. I will stay away from the last piece of cake and eat only like one piece of chocolate…

Regardless I will continue to take my Bitters and drink copious amounts of Chai.

Stay warm out there!

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Winter Solstice Celebration

Winter Solstice is the celebration of the longest night of the year. It is a time to gather with loved ones and reflect on the past year. It is a time to honor what we have lost and gained. We celebrate the harvest and the cycles of the Earth. We honor our own cycles and what has transpired for us since the last dark night.

On Winter Solstice, we gather to write down what we need to get rid of before the return of the Sun. We go deep within and root out our darkest fears, so they can be brought to light, transformed, and released. Build a fire and write down these fears, throw them into the flames and watch them burn and be transformed into smoke and ash. Now write down what you want to cultivate in the year ahead. It can be cultivating kindness, community, or money. Tape your intentions to your bathroom mirror and say them out loud every morning. You will be surprised at how quickly these thoughts and words become reality.

As you hold your ceremony, you might want to have your herbal allies to help bring insight into your fears and intentions.

Herbs that Ground & Guide

Rosemary– spicy, aromatic, and stimulating, rosemary reminds you of who you are. Rosemary guides energy through all three burners (san jiao in Chinese medicine) and transforms dampness, bringing clarity to all situations. A sprig in 8 ounces of hot water will also help with bloating and nausea after eating.

Reishi mushroom– bitter and calming, reishi mushroom assists you in going deep. Reishi calms the mind and the spirit, making it an important herb in quieting an overactive mind and nervous system. One medium sized mushroom can be decocted in a quart of water for 1-12 hours as a medicinal tonic (take 1-4 ounces of decoction daily). The longer you boil, the more bitter the tea becomes.

Marshmallow root– cool and nourishing, marshmallow root soothes irritation in the digestive and urinary tracts. It benefits anybody that needs to be nurtured and supported. One tablespoon of marshmallow root simmered in 8 ounces of water for 15 minutes makes a grounding, earthy tasting tea.

For the love of plants,

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Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Image credit: Annya

 

The Herb Walk Podcast Interview with Jane Bothwell

I wasn’t going to release another podcast episode until next year and then I thought you might want one to listen to on your holiday travels! In this episode I speak with my very first herb teacher, Jane Bothwell.

We discuss her annual medicinal cannabis conference and her many herbal offerings in northern California and around the globe (she is taking small groups to Hawaii and Greece in 2018). Jane’s herb school, Dandelion Herbal Center, is nestled in the redwoods in beautiful and remote Humboldt County, California. An ideal location to connect with the spirit of plants! Through her Festival of Herbs series, she invites herbalists like Rosemary Gladstar, Pam Montgomery, Christopher Hobbs and others from across the U.S. to visit and share their wisdom to the herbal community. She is a gift to us all and I am so happy to share a little of her story with you!

Enjoy this episode of The Herb Walk Podcast and Subscribe today to catch up on all of Season 1 and find out when Season 2 is released next year!