Spicy Herbs & The Metal Element

How is it November already!? Like many of you, I’m surprised once again of how quickly time passes. We are deep into Autumn and the holiday season is quickly approaching. Many of you know that in Chinese medicine theory,  there are 5 Elements or Phases that have several correspondences, including a season. Autumn is associated with the Metal Element, as are the organ systems of the lungs and large intestines, the emotions of grief and acceptance, and the flavor of spicy.

Element Metal
Season Autumn
Color White
Environment Dry
Phase of Life Harvest
Organ Systems Lungs/Large Intestine
Flavor Spicy (Acrid, Pungent)
Sense Organ Nose
Tissue Skin
Emotion Grief/Acceptance
Sound  Crying
Entity Po- Corporeal Soul
Animal Tiger

Each element has a flavor or taste attached to it. In Chinese herbalism, flavors have very specific actions and can travel to precise areas of the body. Understanding the energetics of herbs and foods is essential in combining effective formulas.

The spicy flavor of the herbs has the specific function of dispersing Qi (vital life force energy) from the external part of the body, called the Wei Qi. You’re probably thinking, Ok, so what does dispersing qi from the external part of the body mean?

When qi is dispersed throughout the Wei Qi, the pores open and sweating occurs- reducing body temperature and pushing external pathogens, or “evil qi” out of the body. When someone has a strong Wei Qi, the pathogens that cause cold or flu are pushed out of the body. If there is a weak Wei Qi, the immune system is not strong enough to fight off the pathogen and frequent and recurrent colds may occur. A weakened Wei Qi can also be associated with Lung Qi deficiency  that manifests as seasonal allergies, asthma and even eczema.

After twenty years of studying herbal medicine and ten years as an acupuncturist, I have Resolve Amazon Picyears of experience working with all of these conditions. My love of aromatic plants and Chinese Medicine is what inspired me to create my Baker Botanica 5 Element Essential Oil line. Resolve, my Metal Element blend includes spicy herbs like Eucalyptus radiata, Douglas Fir, Scots Pine, and Tulsi (Holy) Basil.  Terpenes in Holy Basil are proven anti-pyretics (fever reducers) and Eucalyptus radiata is not only safe for children, but also has strong anti-bacterial and expectorant properties. The delicate notes of Douglas Fir and the sharpness of Scots Pine provide additional anti-microbial properties.

The therapeutic properties of aromatic plants are well documented, not only in Chinese medicine, but also from medicines around the world. Today most of us have access to highly medicinal plants and we don’t even think about. Rosemary, thyme, oregano, basil, fennel, cilantro, parsley, garlic, onions, and scallions are found in grocery stores around the world, and although we think of them as culinary herbs, we have forgotten how they have been used as medicine for centuries.

To find out more about spicy herbs, the Metal Element (including our corporeal soul, Po) and more, check out the first episode of Season 2 of my podcast, The Herb Walk with Jessica Baker on iTunes. And please Subscribe and leave a review so I can serve you better!

I almost hate to say it, but the holy days are just around the corner. For fresh ideas, check out my Baker Botanica 5 Element Blends (purchase one or the entire set!) and my book, Plant Songs: Reflections on Herbal Medicine, both available on Amazon.

With love,

JessicaBakerPic 

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

The Herb Walk Podcast: Metal Element Episode

Season 2 of The Herb Walk Podcast with Jessica Baker is finally here!!  

Happy Samhain/Halloween! I am happy to announce the release of Season on one of my favorite holy days, Samhain! Known as Witches’ New Year, Samhain is the end of summer for the Celtic traditions. An auspicious day to release my new season!

In this first episode I introduce the 5 Elements of Chinese Medicine and discuss the Metal Element, the element that is associated with Autumn.

This season I’ll read from my book, Plant Songs: Reflections on Herbal Medicine, discuss Chinese herbal energetics, and interview amazing people like Rachael Carlevale of Ganjasana, Kelly Green of Refugio Altiplano, Nicole Gagliano of Wild & Wise Herbal CSA, and much more!!

Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher and never miss an episode!

With love,

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Subtle Shifts from Yang to Yin

I can feel the stirring of Autumn on the wind. Although we may still have a few sweltering days left in Denver, there is crispness to the air as the sun sets earlier each day. Like the plants and trees around me, I am beginning to go inward. Usually I don’t want Summer to end, but after two months of stifling heat I need a reprieve. The Yang energy that peaks on Summer Solstice now wanes until Yin overtakes it after Autumn Equinox. The subtle shifts from Yang to Yin is palpable now, the cool evening breeze replacing stifling hot nights.

All around my neighborhood, I see the vibrant flowers begin to fade, as their energy concentrates into seeds that will become next year’s beauty. I notice the same natural cycles are occurring within me, I feel an urge to concentrate and reserve that fiery yang energy of the Summer sun. I want to soak in the last few weeks of sunny, hot weather and eagerly await the relief of Autumn.

Observe what the cycles of nature are reflecting back to you. How has your energy changed since the beginning or middle of the season? What have you harvested from the experiences of the last couple of months?

With love,

 cropped-cropped-jessicabaker.jpg

Jessica

when energy flows, wellness grows

Autumn Soup

Try This Recipe for Autumn Tonic Soup

As October glides past us like an autumn leaf, I get excited for the season of root vegetable stews and warm cups of tea.

One of my favorite soups is to throw in any root and vegetable I can find- burdock, dandelion, turnip, carrot, radish, broccoli and throw it in with garlic, ginger, and scallion and as much water as will fill it all.

I let it cook down for hours, adding more scraps, salt, spices and water as I see fit. After satisfied with the extraction of all possible goodness from the plants, I strain off the herbs for composting and am left with the most delicious, medicinal broth imaginable.

I add some sautéed mushrooms and a little chickpea miso to the broth, make a grilled cheese sandwich and sit back and watch the blustery breeze outside. The broth is easy to freeze to be pulled out later for a base in casseroles and other dishes. 

What’s your favorite fall recipe? Comment below!